Encryption is like an apple – it keeps the doctor away, and it does so efficiently.

While other people feel hassled about encryption, it can be considered as your first step in preventing getting “sick” and having to visit the doctor. When you encrypt any information that you send in email messages, IMs, or websites, you are one inch closer to evading identity theft and other online dangers that may be accrued when you expose your data.

What does encryption do?

Encryption was utilized to protect your personal information like driver’s license, social security number, credit card numbers, bank account information, username, passwords, tax returns, and everything personal about you. This new technology can protect your data even if it is stored in your computer and also as it is transmitted into the World Wide Web. For instance, if you encrypt a specific folder in your hard drive including all the files contained in it when another person downloads the data into a USB flash disk and tries to open it using a different computer, the data will not be opened because it is Encrypted email and will only be opened using unique encryption software or have it returned and began on the original computer.

How does encryption work?

Are you familiar with the game cryptoquip? It is a fun puzzle game where a short piece of encrypted text is presented. “Each letter stands for another letter”-this is the most basic rule, so for you to make sense of a jumble of letters in your paper, you have to substitute the letters with another letter. Of course, the fun is in guessing which letter stands for another note. 

That’s how encryption works. However, this particular security technology uses not letters but complicated mathematical algorithms that jumble your digital data into something that can only be read by your computer and its intended recipient (if you’re sending it online). If you are not the intended recipient, you can still encrypt the data and read the message provided that you have the right “key” to cipher the news or put the data back in its proper order. It’s not a very complicated process, and most companies that have developed encryption software for users have created them to be more user-friendly.